My somewhat quirky views as I gaze at the world around me!

Posts tagged ‘World Heritage Site’

MONDAY’S MAGICAL MOMENT: THE SKELLIGS

THE SKELLIGS

These two islands, Skellig Michael and Little Skellig, lie off the coast of County Kerry in the southwest corner of Ireland.   Skellig Michael, or Great Skellig, is a UNESCO World Heritage site.  Up a 1000 year old stone staircase, perched on a narrow ledge, is a 6th century Christian monastery consisting of 6 beehive cells and 2 boat shaped oratories.  The still-standing dry stone structures were inhabited by reclusive monks until the 12th century, when they relocated to the Augustinian Priory at Ballinskellig on the mainland.  By necessity self-sufficient, the monks traded eggs, seal meat and feathers for cereal, tools and animal skins from passing boats.  The skins were used to produce vellum, upon which the monks copied illuminated religious manuscripts.

Today, the Skelligs are home to vast nesting and breeding bird colonies as well as giant basking sharks, dolphins and sea turtles.

Copyright 2013                            Mary Jane E Clark

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MONDAY’S MAGICAL MOMENT: DUNLUCE CASTLE, CO. ANTRIM

DUNLUCE CASTLE

It’s the season……………I forgot yesterday was Monday!  This is Dunluce Castle on the County Antrim Coast in Northern Ireland.  Legend has it that part of the castle tumbled into the sea, carrying several of the help, during a bad winter storm.  It’s precarious perch makes for a spectacular sight very close to the Giant’s Causeway and Bushmill’s Distillery.  For you golfers, the golden strand of beach in  the background is part of the Royal Portstewart Golf Club, which hosted the British Open this year.

Copyright 2012                       Mary Jane E Clark

MONDAY’S MAGICAL MOMENT: GIANT’S CAUSEWAY, CO. ANTRIM

The Giant’s Causeway in County Antrim, Ireland, is a place of myth and mystery.  It’s said that the legendary Finn McCool built the causeway to Scotland to challenge a rival.  And, indeed, these formations are also found off the coast of Scotland and submerged along a direct route from one island to the other.  The over 40,000 interlocking columns (in Ireland) are a UNESCO World Heritage site.  A giant’s walkway or a 60 million year old volcanic legacy?  You decide.  In the far distance is Malin Head, the northernmost point in Ireland, which, politically, is in the “South”.    Click on image to enlarge.  Click on highlighted words for more links.

Copyright 2012        Mary Jane E Clark

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